Functional movement of the jaw
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Functional movement of the jaw the abstracts of papers during 1962 and 1971. by Haruyasu Mitani

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Published by Department of Prosthodontics, Osaka Dental University in [Osaka] .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Mastication -- Abstracts.,
  • Jaws -- Abstracts.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Bibliography: p. 49-56.

Classifications
LC ClassificationsQP310.M3 M57
The Physical Object
Pagination56 p.
Number of Pages56
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5093145M
LC Control Number74164749

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